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Billy Hudson

The Sulfilimine Chemical Bond: A Primordial Innovation in the Extracellular Matrix Essential for Tissue Evolutions

September 20, 2013

Billy G. Hudson, Ph.D., is the Elliott V. Newman Professor of Medicine, Biochemistry and Pathology and director of the Vanderbilt Center for Matrix Biology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Hudson is internationally recognized for key discoveries on the pathogenesis of hereditary Alport syndrome, the autoimmune disease Goodpasture syndrome and diabetic renal disease. Specifically, his team discovered two novel proteins, named α3 and α4 chains of collagen IV, and described how they, together with an α5 chain, assemble and comprise a complex network of basement membranes that function as part of the kidney filtration barrier and is defective in disease. For these discoveries, he received the 2003 Homer W. Smith award, the highest honor from the American Society of Nephrology, for a lifetime of scientific contributions on the molecular nature of basement membranes and the molecular basis of several kidney diseases. He also received the NIH Merit Award in 2002 for studies of basement membranes in 2002. In 2007, Hudson launched the Aspirnaut Initiative with the goal of elevating math and science achievement of rural students in Arkansas by transforming idle time on long school bus rides into productive learning time. Through the program, middle and high school buses are equipped with computers and broadband access so students can watch and listen to online courses, enabling students to gain as many as two extra hours per day of math and science learning. The successful initiative has been duplicated in Maine, Montana and Tennessee.

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Lecture
Sept. 20, 2013
1 p.m.
Monsanto Auditorium

Goodpasture’s (GP) syndrome is an autoimmune disease that attacks the lungs and kidneys. The disease occurs when a person’s immune system mistakenly produces antibodies against a protein called collagen IV in the lungs and kidneys. On Friday, September 20, Dr. Billy Hudson, the Elliott V. Newman Professor of Medicine, Biochemistry, and Pathology and Director of the Vanderbilt Center for Matrix Biology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, will share some of his latest discoveries on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that give rise to this rare but serious disease. In his talk, titled “The Sulfilimine Chemical Bond: A Primordial Innovation in the Extracellular Matrix Essential for Tissue Evolutions,” he will discuss a unique chemical bond, the sulfilimine bond, that helps hold collagen molecules together. The bond is essential for tissue genesis and evolution, and may hold clues to the etiology of GP disease. Additionally, Hudson will talk about the Aspirnaut Initiative, a successful outreach program he founded to help elevate math and science achievement among rural students in Arkansas.

Discussion
Sept. 20, 2013
4 p.m.
Townsend Hall, Room 110

As part of the College of Science and Mathematics Education Research Colloquium, Drs. Billy and Julie Hudson will lead a discussion of innovative outreach efforts aimed at engaging middle and high schools students from rural areas in STEM learning.

Science Outreach & Communication Symposium
Sept. 21, 2013
10 a.m.
Chamber Auditorium, MU Student Center

Drs. Billy and Julie Hudson will speak at the Science Outreach and Communication Symposium about the Aspirnaut Initiative, a successful outreach program he founded to help elevate math and science achievement among rural students in Arkansas. The event is free, but registration is required. For more information, visit asbmb-career-symposium.missouri.edu.